Reviews

For discussion of John Ajvide Lindqvist's novel Himmelstrand
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metoo
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Reviews

Post by metoo » Wed Sep 17, 2014 11:14 am

Another Swedish review, in Sydsvenskan this time.

The reviewer was positive.

http://www.sydsvenskan.se/kultur--nojen ... a-husvagn/
But from the beginning Eli was just Eli. Nothing. Anything. And he is still a mystery to me. John Ajvide Lindqvist

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Re: Reviews

Post by Nightrider » Wed Sep 17, 2014 12:40 pm

From the childlike Google translation I was able to tell that reviewer liked the novel...not loved it, but liked it. I'd still want to read it when it makes it's English language appearance...

Is Lennart a common name in Sweden?
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Re: Reviews

Post by metoo » Wed Sep 17, 2014 4:25 pm

Nightrider wrote:From the childlike Google translation I was able to tell that reviewer liked the novel...not loved it, but liked it. I'd still want to read it when it makes it's English language appearance...
Yes, the reviewer was positive, but not enthusiastic.
Nightrider wrote:Is Lennart a common name in Sweden?
Yes. According to this site, it's the eighth most common first name in Sweden, if all ages are counted, and (I assume) including it's use as a second/middle name. For contemporary children, though, it's not even among the 500 most common names.
But from the beginning Eli was just Eli. Nothing. Anything. And he is still a mystery to me. John Ajvide Lindqvist

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Re: Reviews

Post by metoo » Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:59 pm

But from the beginning Eli was just Eli. Nothing. Anything. And he is still a mystery to me. John Ajvide Lindqvist

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Re: Reviews

Post by Nightrider » Mon Sep 22, 2014 2:43 am

Interesting selection of opinions...
I found the most positive and euphoric review came from Letteratur Magazinet.
Author Henrik Elstad seemed to just go ga-ga over Himmelstrand. Sounds like I felt when reading Människohamn.

The most subdued critique came from SvD KULTUR by Sam Sundberg. It appeared that the author was not exactly floored by the novel and decided against being overly positive or overly negative. Just somewhere in the middle. Very subtle.

The review that disappointed me the most was the one from Skånska.Se written by Elisabeth Östnäs.
When I first heard of Himmelstrand's plot it did remind me a bit of Stephen King type of situation. I was hoping
that I was wrong. Imagine my shock when Östnäs repeatedly compared Lindqvist's novel to the writings of Stephen King.
Naturally, I have yet to read Himmelstrand, but I hope when I do the material will have only a passing resemblance to King's books..If any at all.....
After all, is it a good idea to be constantly compared to someone else?

Another thought.
Do you think that when imminent English version of the novel hits the streets will it successfully translate itself into non-Swedish lexicon and ambience? Is it possible that Himmelstrand is too exotic and inaccessible for Ehglish speaking audience?

Whatever the answer...I can't wait to read this novel.
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Re: Reviews

Post by metoo » Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:53 am

Nightrider wrote:Another thought.
Do you think that when imminent English version of the novel hits the streets will it successfully translate itself into non-Swedish lexicon and ambience? Is it possible that Himmelstrand is too exotic and inaccessible for Ehglish speaking audience?
I see few if any any culture-specific problems, so yes, I think it will readily translate.
But from the beginning Eli was just Eli. Nothing. Anything. And he is still a mystery to me. John Ajvide Lindqvist

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Re: Reviews

Post by EEA » Mon Sep 22, 2014 6:52 pm

Cool. Can't wait for the English translation of the book. I prefer the English version because I have read LTROI in Spanish and the translation in some parts felt out of place.

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Re: Reviews

Post by StefL » Fri Jan 08, 2016 8:57 am

metoo wrote:
Nightrider wrote:Another thought.
Do you think that when imminent English version of the novel hits the streets will it successfully translate itself into non-Swedish lexicon and ambience? Is it possible that Himmelstrand is too exotic and inaccessible for Ehglish speaking audience?
I see few if any any culture-specific problems, so yes, I think it will readily translate.
Having just read the book myself (a slow starter this time...) I actually did think about how it would work out in English while I read it. I also think it will not present any major problems, although it does contain a fair amount of references to songs written by Peter Himmelstrand. I'm sure that will be explainable though - at least to readers familiar with JAL's habit of weaving Swedish cultural aspects into his stories.
Aside from this the story is about general human things - as long as one is familiar with the concept of caravan camping :D

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Re: Reviews

Post by metoo » Fri Jan 08, 2016 10:10 am

StefL wrote:Aside from this the story is about general human things - as long as one is familiar with the concept of caravan camping.
I don't see lack of familiarity with caravan camping as a particularly severe obstacle. I've never camped that way myself, and I was able to read the book. :-D
(I have done some camping in a tent, though. With my parents and siblings in the sixties, when tents still were dominating the camping grounds. Ah, those were the days!)
But from the beginning Eli was just Eli. Nothing. Anything. And he is still a mystery to me. John Ajvide Lindqvist

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Re: Reviews

Post by StefL » Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:44 pm

metoo wrote:
StefL wrote:Aside from this the story is about general human things - as long as one is familiar with the concept of caravan camping.
I don't see lack of familiarity with caravan camping as a particularly severe obstacle. I've never camped that way myself, and I was able to read the book. :-D
(I have done some camping in a tent, though. With my parents and siblings in the sixties, when tents still were dominating the camping grounds. Ah, those were the days!)
I was more thinking about the knowledge of the existence of a phenomenon such as caravan camping. If I remember correctly I've only spent one night in a caravan myself and that was some 30 years ago. But I guess caravans and camping grounds are common enough across the world for most readers to know about them.
Then again, perhaps phenomena such as old Western movies are hard enough to relate to if you're in your 20's. Interestingly I was at a 50's style hamburger restaurant North of Karlstad a few days ago and next to our table was a movie poster for The Man from Laramie starring James Stewart :D

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